How much bandwidth will the videos take up?

We’re asked this question every single day and we’ll do our best to provide the most succinct answer possible.

The first thing to establish is: are you going to be hosting the original files yourselves and playing the videos from those files. If the answer is “yes” then you’ll certainly need to take into consideration both the overall size of all the videos you’re hosting within the collection, the number of people likely to access that content and just how many you believe will access video content at the same time.

You’ll need to discuss this with your IT department who will be able to do the calculations for you and let you know how efficient or otherwise it will be.

If you’re not planning to host the original MP4 files then you’ll be streaming the content from another organisation’s server such as Amazon Web Services or Wistia, who themselves are hosting the original content files. In this situation the demands on your internet connection are significantly less (although estimating loading is still worthwhile).

It’s also worth remembering that any online solution may be impacted by whether or not the person viewing will view this content from home. You cannot control all the scenarios in which the content will be accessed, but it’s worth considering. These days, most devices, work or personal will handle most forms of e-learning. Just watch out for some content providers, whose e-learning files may get very large (greater than 200MB) and which may need compressing before performing at their best.

How can Mi Crow help?

We offer a couple of different ways to consume our content.  You can access our courses via our hosted Portal (which we call the Nest).  This way we bear the brunt of all the hosting and all you have to do is point your learners to our platform.  Easy peasy!

Alternatively, you can put our content on to your LMS.  We allow you to upload our files to your LMS.  The simplest way to do this is through an embed code (essentially a URL) which will also reduce the amount of files you need to physically store on your server.  Doubly easy peasy!